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larrywww

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Reply with quote  #1 
http://www.popularmechanics.com/home/how-to-plans/a20859/sears-sold-70000-homes-from-their-catalog-are-you-living-in-one/

Actually, it's not a bad thing, if it is true.  Now that Sears stores and other retail stores are dwindling in #, I thought it was an interesting article.

According to the article:

These Sears homes weren't cheap low-end houses. Many of them were built using the finest quality building materials available during that time. It's not uncommon to find Sears homes today with oak floors, cypress siding, and cedar shingles. As with most old homes, the tough part is finding one that has been well maintained, and with the youngest of Sears homes going now eight decades old, they all require a significant amount of care. From 1908 to 1940, Sears sold between 70,000 to 75,000 homes, so there are plenty out there, you just need to know where to look.
chatterweb

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Reply with quote  #2 
Ellen is behind this Idea:

http://cocoon9.com/



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larrywww

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Reply with quote  #3 
These tiny houses may be popular in the press and the popular imagination, but cities and building departments hate them (by and large) and seem to have no interest in making it cost effective.
In alot of building department you can ask about tiny houses and they will basically say they have nothing that addresses that situation---there's also nothing that (in many cases) permits building on a minimum lot size---though I haven't done a survey or anything.  I have heard that some builders will group together some of these tiny units into small multifamilies.  But I'm not sure how widespread that is.

Same with granny flats---the legislature wanted to encourage them and passed a law to do that.  Last I heard there was only like a handful ever built in San Diego County.  (I'm thinking the # was like less than 5---but who cares?  It was incredibly low # whatever it was.  This isn't my area, but I just heard a contractor mention it.)

Remember the Katrina Cottage /Katrina Cabin?  They only ended up building like 100 of them and the manufacturer found it couldnt get any traction.  At one point they were available at Lowes website, but no longer available.

Here is an article about it.

https://www.treehugger.com/tiny-houses/so-what-ever-happened-katrina-cottages.html

The Cocoon doesn't mention prices, though in my experience they don't exactly come as cheap as you might imagine.

But an intriguing idea, I will admit, but an idea that may only exist on the drawing board in alot of places.  You definitely can build with modular houses, but the price tag isn't necessarily cheap.
The younger generations are already a  generation of renters---and won't be easy to change that picture.  
We are facing a housing storage, but that doesn't mean that NIMBY cities and city officials are going to navigate out of their comfort zones anytime soon.
rickencin

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Reply with quote  #4 
"You will never have to worry as long as Sears Roebuck keeps a goin' " 2:00 minutes (1931)





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