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larrywww

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Reply with quote  #1 
The earthquake scale is what they call logarithmic.

In practical terms, it means that the difference between a 6 earthquake and a 7 earthquake isn't just slightly bigger---it's a 10 fold increase.

And the difference between a 5 earthquake and a 7 is 100 times greater.  And between a 4 and a 7 is 1000 fold.
(I think---I'm no expert).

This is one explanation I found on the web:

The magnitude scale is logarithmic. That just means that if you add 1 to anearthquake's magnitude, you multiply the shaking by 10. ... For example, if themagnitude of one quake is 6 and another is 4, than the difference in magnitudes is 2, so the stronger earthquake shakes 10^2 or 100 times as hard as the milder one.Mar 15, 2011
larrywww

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Reply with quote  #2 
So, Ridgecrest wasn't part of the San Andreas fault.

But the US Geological Service now says that there is a 70% chance of an earthquake in the Bay Area by 2030.

Yet another reason to cash out of this market.

https://www.cnn.com/2019/07/06/us/what-is-the-san-andreas-fault-line-trnd/index.html
larrywww

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Reply with quote  #3 
The latest  update says that the 7.1 quake released 11 more times the energy of the 6.4 original quake.

https://www.cnn.com/us/live-news/california-earthquake-intl/index.html
elcortez_1953

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Reply with quote  #4 
Quote:
Originally Posted by larrywww
So, Ridgecrest wasn't part of the San Andreas fault.

But the US Geological Service now says that there is a 70% chance of an earthquake in the Bay Area by 2030.

Yet another reason to cash out of this market.

https://www.cnn.com/2019/07/06/us/what-is-the-san-andreas-fault-line-trnd/index.html

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daniel weise
elcortez_1953

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Reply with quote  #5 
Well,looks like we are slowly moving towards San Francisco,that's not good!  one has to seriously contemplate though:   what would a Big One look like for this super dense populated coastal California,the fifth largest economy in the world? yes,many will pack up and leave for good but thousands of Contractors will be flooding in from as far away as Florida for the re building. the federal gov will throw hundreds of billions at the state or whatever it takes.   No 1 problem for the residents will be drinking water as stores will be sold out within one hour IMO.    so never a bad idea to stock up on water.
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daniel weise
larrywww

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Reply with quote  #6 
The amazing thing is how little damage there was.  In this not so fancy area of the high desert you have alot of small single story structures----not alot of multi story structures.  Maybe that is why the reports weren't generally of walls and ceilings collapsing---I don't know--but it is striking.  (I don't know personally, but this is what I have read).

Yes, you did have some mobile home communities that sustained damage----but they are generally the flimsiest structures.

Contrast this with the 6.7 earthquake in Northridge----an upscale area with alot of 2 story homes, etc----the damages were far greater.

Actually, what we are seeing is wildfires are replacing earthquakes as the greatest threat.  I believe that fire insurance premiums are going to skyrocket---insurance companies are not used to being the dumb money in paying for any type of catastrophe.  The most recent fires barreled through communities faster than a very speedy freight train---little you could do and no ability to run since you couldn't outrun the fire anyway.  Paradise had so few exit roads---the fire mowed down entire lines of cars seeking to leave---the people had nowhere to go.  An astounding number of structures have been torched----similar to old time catastrophic earthquakes.

That fact that we are going to experience extended droughts means that there will more and more fires---not much you can do about the weather.

Also, right now earthquake insurance is completely unaffordable---most homeowners go bare and just risk it.  What happens when even fire insurance isn't affordable?   The new fires powered by abnormally high winds appear generally unstoppable.  You can't bank on having zero sources of ignition----they are always out there.    Our construction standards really can't stand up to abnormal forces like this---and it is way too late to try to change the standards to cover most homeowners.
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